🌐 Public

The Hard Road to Simple Products

By Wouter de Bres for Gibbon University

Introduction

This playlist is for everyone who is building digital products and wants to learn how to keep things simple. Simplicity is one of the hardest things to reach in product development. It requires a brutal dictator mentality to keep the product focussed on its core functionality. Don't get distracted by all the feature requests. Stay focussed on why people use your product.

Wouter de Bres — Designer • Co-founder Gibbon • Psychologist

Added by Wouter de Bres: “This chapter is from the book 'Getting Real' from 37Signals. The chapter describes perfectly the core principle of simple products is that you come to agree with yourself that it is OK to build less. Less features, less options and less promises. Less product means a easier to understand product. An easier to understand product means more happy users.

1 Build Less

So what to do then? The answer is less. Do less than your competitors to beat them. Solve the simple problems and leave the hairy, difficult, nasty problems to everyone else. Instead of oneupping, try one-downing. Instead of outdoing, try underdoing.

Added by Wouter de Bres: “This article explains very well why simplicity is not simple to achieve at all.

2 The Complexity of Simplicity

By Luke Wroblewski "Simplicity doesn't come easy." Though many business strategies and publications continue to trumpet the power of simplicity in the design of digital products, for lots of companies and product teams, simplicity doesn't come easy. "Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."-Charles Mingus While there are many reasons why keeping things

Added by Wouter de Bres: “Products, features or design problems might always seem easy at first glance. It is easy to just smack on an extra button or go down the easy route. But every change in the product even if it seems tiny for others, it is the job of the product owner to think through every aspect and consequence. Steve Jobs says it beautifully in this quote.

3 Steve Jobs on Problem Solving

When you start looking at a problem and it seems really simple, you don't really understand the complexity of the problem. Then you get into the problem, and you see that it's really complicated, and you come up with all these convoluted solutions. That's sort of the middle, and that's where most people stop... But the really great person will

Added by Wouter de Bres: “Benedikt Lehnert — who is Chief Product at Wunderlist — explains very well why you should rather create a process that aims to leave stuff out instead of trying to add new features to your product.

4 Thoughts on Product Design Processes

In a startup, your product is everything. It is why you start your endeavor. It defines your culture, the way you work and it builds your brand - especially in the early days. You hire people based on your product vision and you find costumers that understand why they need your product and pay you money for using it. The

Added by Wouter de Bres: “The default answer to new feature requests should always be 'NO'. To implement a new feature you need a damn good reason.

6 Start With No

Make features work hard to be implementedThe secret to building half a product instead of a half-ass product is saying no. Each time you say yes to a feature, you're adopting a child. You have to take your baby through a whole chain of events (e.g. design, implementation, testing, etc.). And once that feature's out there, you're stuck with it.

Added by Wouter de Bres: “Stick to what's truly essential in you product. Don't get tempted to add all kind of features just because the sales guy likes that.

7 Half, Not Half-Assed

Beware of the "everything but the kitchen sink" approach to web app development. Throw in every decent idea that comes along and you'll just wind up with a half-assed version of your product. What you really want to do is build half a product that kicks ass.

Added by Wouter de Bres: “It takes an awesome product manager to build great simple products... But what is a great products manager?

8 Product Hunt Blog — What Makes a Great Product Manager? 10 Product Experts Weigh In

What Makes a Great Product Manager? 10 Product Experts Weigh In As a follow up to our collection of Product Management Tools last week, we asked 10 product pros in the PH community what it takes to be a great product manager. Here's what they had to say: A good PM is a scientist, armchair psychologist, and janitor in cross

Added by Wouter de Bres: “Simple design is often simple for the user but complicated for the creator. To make a product that is obvious for the user you might have to go through a painfully difficult design process. That's ok.

9 Making Good Design Decisions

There's a popular misconception that NASA spent millions in a failed attempt to create a space pen while the Russians just used pencils. The implication is that good design is simple in the sense that it is simplistic or obvious. Simple design is often simple for the user but complicated for the creator. They really do use pens in space.

Added by Wouter de Bres: “Something that can greatly improve the user experience of a product is giving your users less choice. Choice is overrated.

10 The Next Big Thing In Design? Less Choice

Choice is overrated. Recently, I decided to buy Monopoly to play with my son. What I was sure would be a quick decision on Amazon turned into a learning experience for both of us. Did you know there are 2,767 versions of Monopoly on the market and that the original version is not the easiest to find? My attempt at

Added by Wouter de Bres: “Beware of the fallacy that the next new feature will suddenly make people use your product.

12 The Next Feature Fallacy

A few weeks ago, I read this tweet, and found myself nodding my head in vigorous agreement. The Next Feature Fallacy: the fallacy that the next feature you add will suddenly make people want to use the entire product. - Joshua Porter (@bokardo) May 14, 2015 For people who love to build product, when something's not working, it's tempting to

Ariel Elboim

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Alexander Avramenko

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

alessandraoli

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

jowtape

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Tony Seeds

Freshman

  • 1 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

vabtan

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Vladimir Milojevic

Freshman

  • 1 Playlists
  • 1 Followers

Limpuls

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Gordon Hatusupy

Information Designer - founder of @studiobrandstof

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Lindsay Liebson

Music enthusiast, artist, designer, and aspiring entrepreneur living in SF.

  • 2 Playlists
  • 162 Followers

Reza Faiz A Rahman

Interface Crafter

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

terrence.mcdonough

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Pacster Mt

Overkommando at raidho.mx

  • 8 Playlists
  • 473 Followers

Ada Chiu

Industrial Designer / Travel Enthusiast ✈️

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Lex Vargas

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Jitachi Garcia

Designer.

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Francesca Mey

Freshman

  • 6 Playlists
  • 3 Followers

stuart lamour

ux developer at sussex uni

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

Alisher Hasanov

product, blah blah blah

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers

clydeboyer

Freshman

  • 0 Playlists
  • 0 Followers
Load more

Delete your comment

Are you sure you want to delete your comment?