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Extraordinary Criminal Cases

By Anastasia Demina

Introduction

This is a collection of selected stories on crime history, police work and ethical questions connected with crime & punishment. I add up new items (texts and videos) from various sources every week and write my own additional notes to them for you. (Sadly) famous killers and frauds from all over the world - in details. Crimes with extraordinary preparation. Criminals that were not who they seemed to be at first - at all. Great police failures vs. heroic policemen. Crimes with multiple crimes in them and without any real crime. Ethical questions: what decision will you make? Please, join my course, if you like criminal stories and good stories in general=) P.S. IF YOU CAN'T VIEW the whole note due to its length, try viewing the chapter in "clean reading" mode (the button is in the left corner) - that will show the full teacher's text to the chapter.

Anastasia Demina — Travelling, Korean language and forensic science lover from Russia. CEO at Future Biotech - educational ...

Added by Anastasia Demina: “This is a summary of a book called "People Who Eat Darkness" (I highly recommend it by the way. You can find it here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0374230595 (Amazon doesn't pay me for ads, so I really do like the book=) This is a story about a young British woman named Lucie Blackman, who was in debt and went to Japan to earn some money by being hostess in bars. Lucie disappeared 2 months after her arrival, and later was found killed by a man named Joji Obara. He was a serial rapist and used chloroform to make the victims pass out. In Lucie (and another girl's) case Joji overdosed his victim, and that lead to liver failure and death. The case is extraordinary by a number of reasons, all of which are sad and make you disappointed in humanity: 1). Japanese police practically did nothing on Lucie's case before being heavily pushed by British officials, Lucie's family and press. It turned out that police didn't investigate many rape cases for years, especially when the victims were foreign women. 2). Japanese police was found underqualified to investigate violent and complicated criminal cases. Japan has a low rate of crime, so policemen have little experience in solving murders. In Lucie's case their work was slow and sloppy. Even tracking the number of the anonymous phone caller took months! And, as the book says, after Lucie's family contacted media and tried to get answers from the police, the police chiefs refused to cooperate further. 3). It took Japanese court 7 years after Lucie's body discovery to find Joji Obara guilty. Court hearings were held only once a month - that's the law in Japan. 4). The Blackman family fell into pieces after Lucie's death. That is very sad, but understandable. What I can't understand is why Lucie's father took half a million British pounds from his daughter's killer to soften his own testimony in court. The article descripts all the details of the case pretty accurate. It doesn't have Lucie and Obara photos, but you can see them here: Lucie Blackman - http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/06/03/article-2153939-136BFE6A000005DC-81_306x423.jpg Joji Obara - http://i4.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article2463603.ece/alternates/s615b/Joji-Obara.jpg

1 The Death of Lucie Blackman: how murder case showed the incompetence of Japanese police due to the low crime rate in the country

In classic tales of real-life murder - Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, John Berendt's Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Gordon Burn's Somebody's Husband, Somebody's Son - the narrator isn't a detached observer but a man possessed. Where the crime reporter files his copy and gets a good night's sleep, the Capotes, Burns and Berendts can't let go

Added by Anastasia Demina: “Silk Road used to be an online market in so-called Dark Web - the part of the internet that is highly anonymous and can be viewed only via crypted Tor software. Silk Road sold mainly drugs and prescription pills (but guns, erotica and hacking software too) and used Bitcoin as payment system. Buyers and sellers remained anonymous and could communicate with each other via special messenger. (If you're interested how the delivery worked - well, for example LSD could be sent on postage stamps on the envelope and guns were sent by parts, with each part hidden in smth. else) FBI conducted that Silk Road did $1.2 billion worth of business between February of 2011 and July of 2013. That accounted for $79.8 million in profit for Silk Road owner, whose nickname was Dread Pirate Roberts. Some studies tell that he earned about $92 000 a day from his business. In 2012 Silk Road had over 1200 sellers, more than 40% of whom were from the U.S. In 2013 market had about 1 mln registered users. When the FBI busted Silk Road owner - Ross Ulbricht - in 2013, we learned that he was: a). a young guy (29 y.o.) b). a research scientist c). an active member of tech communities (had a Stack Overflow account, for example) d). San Francisco citizen e). against government overregulation of the economy (that's why he owned SK, in addition to getting profit) f). against government agencies reading private information. Adding that to the fact that as an online market Silk Road used a lot of innovation (Tor, Bitcoin etc), we can call it an IT startup of sorts. Carnegie Mellon did a whole research on Silk Road, you can read the results here: https://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/nicolasc/publications/Christin-WWW13.pdf It's a 10-page-long read, but it's really inetersting, especially for economists and cyber security professionals. If you don't have time for that, then read the article in this chapter - it covers the main findings of the researchers and shows how the business was operated. The SK owner did an interview for Forbes once, you can find it here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/08/14/an-interview-with-a-digital-drug-lord-the-silk-roads-dread-pirate-roberts-qa/ The trial in SK case is set to begin in January 2015. Some people find it doubtful that Ulbricht was the real mastermind behind the business.

2 Silk Road: online drug market as an (almost) Silicon Valley startup

Image Credit: Nicolas ChristinUpdate: They got him. At around noon on October 2, Reuters reported that the FBI had finally seized illicit underground narcotics website Silk Road. In San Francisco on Tuesday, the FBI arrested Ross William Ulbricht - also known by his alias "Dread Pirate Roberts" - who they believe to be the operator of the site. Reuters reported

Added by Anastasia Demina: “A video interview (originally - a part of the film called "Life After Manson") with Patricia Krenwinkel, one of the Charles Manson accomplices. Charles Manson was a murderer and a cult leader. He and his female companions committed a series of murders in Los Angeles in 1969, one of them - of Sharon Tate, director Roman Polanski's wife, who was pregnant at that time. Manson is still alive and in prison, with no remorse about his deed. You can read about him here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Manson Patricia was 19 when she met Manson and joined his group. She participated in murders and was sentenced to life in prison. During her trial, she doodled Satanic images, shaved her head and carved an X into her forehead. 45 years later, being an old and harmless-looking woman, Krenwinkel tells her story (sitting in jail), uncovering the reasons for her crimes and her affection towards Manson. Patricia's case sets a dilemma for all of us: does the person who has committed horrible crimes at the young age and under certain influence deserve pardon after so many years? Do people change their mind radically with age?

3 Charles Manson partner in crime 45 years later: does she deserve pardon? (video)

Patricia Krenwinkel, aka "Katie," played a key part in the infamous Tate-LaBianca murders spearheaded by Charles Manson in 1969. She stabbed Abigail Folger so many times, police thought the coffee heiress' originally white nightgown was bought red when they found her body. She also stabbed Rosemary LaBianca, and wrote "DEATH TO PIGS" on a wall on the LaBiancas' house and

Added by Anastasia Demina: “A story about the undercover police agent who worked against radical animal-rights groups in the UK in 1980. This man went to become a husband of one of the group members and the father of her child - all that while staying under his fake name and on a mission. Then he suddenly disappeared from his family's life, only to be found by his wife by accident almost 30 years later. This chapter sets another ethical question: should policemen respect feelings of the people they spy on and potential criminals, or the end justifies the means?

4 The British Undercover Cop Who Went Too Far

I-JUNE 14, 2012It was four o'clock on a Thursday afternoon, and Jacqui had just got home from work. She made a pot of coffee and took it out to the garden with the Daily Mail. It was the start of her weekend. The sun was out. She sat down at a patio table and poured the coffee, taking a minute

Added by Anastasia Demina: “One of the few (if not the only one) successful cases of hijacking that took place in 1971. The man who stole Boeing 727 aircraft was never identified, let alone found. The witnesses described him as polite and calm, not willing to hurt anyone on the plane. The way hijacker planned his crime and left the plane that was followed by a military aircraft is trully fascinating, and many details are not clear even today. FBI still searches for the hijacker. The case of D.B. Cooper, how the FBI nicknamed the man, lead to the creation of new rules in airport security and aircraft modifications, making this crime kind of a historical event for the aviation. There is no ethical question for that chapter, it's just an example of a criminal that may be admired in some weird way for his genius AND not harming anyone in the process.

5 The Great Hijacker - D.B. Cooper Case

Northwest Orient Airlines Flight 305Hijacking summarySiteBetween Portland, Oregon and Seattle, Washington, USA Passengers36 plus hijacker Injuries (non-fatal)none known Fatalitiesnone known (hijacker‍ '​s fate unknown) Survivorsall 42 passengers and crew Aircraft typeBoeing 727 OperatorNorthwest Orient Airlines Flight originPortland International Airport DestinationSeattle-Tacoma International Airport D. B. Cooper is a media epithet popularly used to refer to an unidentified man who hijacked a

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